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Tag: a farmer and a snake story writing in english

a farmer and a snake story writing in english

a farmer and a snake story writing in english插图

A farmer takes pity on a frozen snake and brings it home. Thawed, the snake reverts to character and bites all. The wicked show no thanks.Eliot/Jacobs VersionOne winter a Farmer found a Snake stiff and frozen with cold. He had compassion on it, and taking it up, placed it under his coat.

What is the moral of story farmer and the Snake?

The same story could be written under the title Moral Story Farmer and the Snake, Moral Story Nature cannot be changed and Nature Never Changes Story. This story is taken from the Notes of Sir Rana Attique from Farooqabad.

Why did the farmer put the snake in his bosom?

The Farmer and the Snake A Farmer walked through his field one cold winter morning. On the ground lay a Snake, stiff and frozen with the cold. The Farmer knew how deadly the Snake could be, and yet he picked it up and put it in his bosom to warm it back to life.

What is the summary of the fable The farmer and the Viper?

This fable, numbered 176 in the Perry Index, is also known as The Farmer and the Viper. A Farmer walked through his field one cold winter morning. On the ground lay a Snake, stiff and frozen with the cold. The Farmer knew how deadly the Snake could be, and yet he picked it up and put it in his bosom to warm it back to life.

How did the farmer take pity on the frozen snake?

A farmer takes pity on a frozen snake and brings it home. Thawed, the snake reverts to character and bites all. The wicked show no thanks. One winter a Farmer found a Snake stiff and frozen with cold. He had compassion on it, and taking it up, placed it under his coat.

How did the farmer know the snake was deadly?

The Farmer knew how deadly the Snake could be, and yet he picked it up and put it in his bosom to warm it back to life . The Snake soon revived, and when it had enough strength, bit the man who had been so kind to it. The bite was deadly and the Farmer felt that he must die.

What does the wasp stand for in the Bewick Society?

The wasp may stand for the snake of the fable in its vicious sting. – The Bewick Society

What is the nature of ingrates?

It is the nature of ingrates to return evil for good: and the moralists in all ages have incessantly declaimed against the enormity of this crime, concluding that they who are capable of hurting their benefactors, are not fit to live in a community; being such, as the natural ties of parent, friend, or country, are too weak to restrain within the bounds of society. Indeed, the sin of ingratitude is so detestable, that, as none but the most inhuman temper can be guilty of it, so, in writing to men, there is no occasion to use many words, either in exposing the vice itself, or dissuading people from the commission of it. Therefore it is not likely that a person of Aesop’s sagacity would have compiled this fable, without having something else in view, besides this trite and obvious subject. He certainly intended to put us in mind, that as none but a poor silly clown would go to take up a Snake and cherish it, so we shall be very negligent and ill-advised, if, in doing good offices, we do not take care to bestow our benevolence upon proper objects. It was not at all unnatural in the Snake to hiss, and brandish his tongue, and fly at the first that came near him; as soon at the person that saved his life as any other; indeed more likely, because nobody else had so much to do with him. Nor is it strange at any time to see a reprobate fool throwing his poisonous language about,and committing his extravagancies against those, more especially,who are so inadvertent as to concern themselves with him. The Snake and the reprobate will not appear extraordinary in their malevolence: but the sensible part of mankind cannot help thinking those guilty of great indiscretion, who receive either of them into their protection.

What happened to the Snake in Townsend?

Townsend version. One winter a Farmer found a Snake stiff and frozen with cold. He had compassion on it, and taking it up, placed it in his bosom. The Snake was quickly revived by the warmth, and resuming its natural instincts, bit its benefactor, inflicting on him a mortal wound.

What happens when a farmer takes pity on a frozen snake and brings it home?

A farmer takes pity on a frozen snake and brings it home. Thawed, the snake reverts to character and bites all.

Why did the snake fly at the first that came near him?

It was not at all unnatural in the Snake to hiss, and brandish his tongue, and fly at the first that came near him; as soon at the person that saved his life as any other; indeed more likely, because nobody else had so much to do with him.

Where did the snake lay in the villager’s hearth?

Having pity on the poor creature, he brought it home, and laid it on the hearth near the fire. Revived by the heat, it reared itself up, and with dreadful hissings flew at the wife and children of its benefactor.