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Tag: can i sell meat from my farm

can i sell meat from my farm

can i sell meat from my farm插图

Can I sell meat directly off my farm?Yes, many farmers sell meats directly off their farm. These meats are still required to be processed in a state– or federally-inspected facility and must be labeled properly just as if you were selling the meats any where else.

Can I sell meat at a farmers market?

At certified Farmers’ Markets, all meat sold must be processed by a federally inspected facility. It must also be clearly labeled as having been processed at that facility. 4. Will my market fees be higher if I sell meat?

Do I need a license to sell meat in Michigan?

Farmers selling individual retail cuts or bundles of meat directly to consumers must also be USDA inspected and in Michigan, additional licensing is needed. Meat from animals slaughtered and processed under USDA inspection must meet labeling requirements. The USDA inspection mark must appear on the label of every package of meat.

How much can you make selling meat by the cut?

You can make more money per animal if you sell meat by the cut. For example, lamb chops can sell for $15 to $20 per pound, whereas a whole lamb sells for $6 to $10 per pound hanging weight.

How do you sell meat to a locker?

You have two basic options. You can have your meat processed and then sell individual cuts, either wholesale or retail, which means you are selling meat. Or you can sell the whole animal to one person (or two) and deliver that animal to the locker for processing.

What is custom exempt slaughter?

Meat that was slaughtered and processed under custom exempt may only be consumed by the owner of the live animal, his/her family, or non-paying guests. When animals are slaughtered and processed under custom exempt conditions, no inspection of the carcass or parts occurs, thus the owner of the live animal assumes some degree of risk associated with consuming the meat. If an animal is going to be eaten by four different individuals (sold as quarters or half-of-a-half), then all four individuals must own the live animal prior to slaughter. The owner (s) of the live animal, who should have documentation of ownership, needs to pay the processing fees to the processor. Custom exempt slaughter and processing is under USDA-FSIS jurisdiction. Every package of meat produced under custom exempt conditions must clearly be marked NOT FOR SALE. This meat cannot be sold or donated to anyone.

What is the USDA inspection mark?

The USDA inspection mark must appear on the label of every package of meat. If there are no marketing claims included on the label, a generic label can be used. These generic labels are pre-approved for each USDA inspected plant.

What is the FSIS for meat?

Farmers selling meat direct from their farm need to be in compliance with United States Department of Agriculture ( USDA) Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) regulations.

What information is needed for a farmer to add to a label?

This includes basic point of contact information like name, address, phone number, email or website address.

Can you sell meat in Michigan?

Meat that has been slaughtered and processed under USDA inspection can be sold by the carcass (or half, quarter, etc.) or as individual retail cuts. Meat sold to restaurants, grocery stores or at farmers markets must be USDA Inspected. Farmers selling individual retail cuts or bundles of meat directly to consumers must also be USDA inspected and in Michigan, additional licensing is needed.

Can a meat label be misleading?

No label on a meat product can be false or misleading to the customer or consumer. Starting in January 2012, there will be additional label requirements that meat processors will have to follow for single-ingredient raw meat products.

How much money can you make selling meat?

For example, lamb chops can sell for $15 to $20 per pound, whereas a whole lamb sells for $6 to $10 per pound hanging weight. Keep in mind that some of the “hanging weight” will wind up in the garbage, such as bones, unless you ask for them, so not every pound of hanging weight is edible. You also have more expenses with your on-farm store, freezers, and electricity. If you only have a few animals to sell each year, ultimately you would make more money if you sell them as whole animals. I once heard someone at a conference say that you should not be selling individual cuts unless you had at least 100 animals per year to sell. I think that’s high, but I wouldn’t even think about an on-farm store until I was processing at least ten head of cattle or twenty smaller animals, such as pigs or sheep, annually. Your expenses will vary based upon whether or not you already have a building that can be used as a farm store or how you want to build it. Ultimately you need to do the math to figure out which one will be more profitable in your situation.

How to sell meat?

If you raise cattle, pigs, sheep, and other four-legged animals, how can you sell meat? You have two basic options. You can have your meat processed and then sell individual cuts, either wholesale or retail, which means you are selling meat. Or you can sell the whole animal to one person (or two) and deliver that animal to the locker for processing. In that situation, you are technically selling an animal, rather than meat.

How many customers do you need to sell a whole animal?

If you sell the whole animal and deliver it to the locker for processing, you only need to find one customer for each animal. Sometimes two people will split a beef. While it’s true that not that many people want to buy a whole animal, you don’t need to find that many customers. If you only have two or three extra lambs, for example, you only need to find two or three customers, rather than a dozen or more, if you were selling individual cuts of meat.

Can you sell meat to a person?

You can have your meat processed and then sell individual cuts, either wholesale or retail, which means you are selling meat. Or you can sell the whole animal to one person (or two) and deliver that animal to the locker for processing. In that situation, you are technically selling an animal, rather than meat.

Is hanging weight edible?

Keep in mind that some of the “hanging weight” will wind up in the garbage, such as bones, unless you ask for them, so not every pound of hanging weight is edible. You also have more expenses with your on-farm store, freezers, and electricity.

Is it a good idea to have an on farm store?

It’s a good idea to have an on-farm store so that you can have regular hours and won’t have customers walking through your house. One of the biggest disadvantages of selling individual cuts is that you have to find a lot of customers, and most will only buy a few cuts and come back regularly as they do in the supermarket.

Want to sell meat? Check out the rules for your state

Producers who want to sell cuts of meat directly to customers must follow rules related to inspection, labeling and more. Jenny Schlecht / Agweek

Iowa

Under Iowa state law, species of deer and elk also must be inspected before they can be sold for food in the state. For more information on labeling and other specifications, visit https://www.iowaagriculture.gov/meatAndPoultry/slaughter_Processing.asp .

Minnesota

The meat from wild game cannot be sold and can only be consumed by the owner, the owner’s immediate family, and non-paying guests. Wild game meat must be identified “NOT FOR SALE.” For more information on meat processing in Minnesota, visit https://www.mda.state.mn.us/food-feed/starting-meat-poultry-processing-business .

Montana

Facilities that store meat for retail or wholesale require meat depot licenses, available from the Montana Department of Livestock. For more information on meat processing, including flow charts on what type of processor is needed in different circumstances, visit https://liv.mt.gov/Meat-Milk-Inspection/Meat-and-Poultry-Inspection .

North Dakota

A farmer may sell up to 1,000 chickens off the farm without inspection provided that the slaughter and processing are conducted under sanitary standards, practices and procedures, the producer is registered with the state Department of Agriculture and that accurate records of all poultry sold are kept.

South Dakota

Bison, elk, deer, etc., processed under state inspection in South Dakota can be sold across state lines. More information about labeling and other details can be found at https://aib.sd.gov/pdfs/Selling%20and%20Distributing%20Red%20Meat%20in%20SD.pdf .

1. How must meat be transported and stored?

You may be able to simply bring the meat that you produce at home to the market in a chest cooler and offer it for sale; however, there are some markets that require you to use an electrically powered chest freezer.

2. Must the meat you sell come from your farm?

Some Farmers’ Markets require that items sold be locally produced. Others will allow vendors to purchase produce and other items wholesale and resell them.

3. What kind of certification is required?

Sale of Meat products may require federal inspection and stamping before sale. It’s very important that farmers contact the county board of health to determine exactly what they need in order to sell their goods.

4. Will my market fees be higher if I sell meat?

In some markets, there is a certified section that is especially intended for the sale of fresh, homegrown meat that has been properly processed by a certified facility.

5. Must all meat products be certified?

There may also be a community section of the market where meat products that contain other ingredients, such as the spices and other dry ingredients included in sausage may be sold without certification.

What if someone wants to slaughter livestock I have sold to them on my farm?

If this is an option you choose, you may want to make disposal of items such as the hide and offal the responsibility of your customer.

What is a custom processor?

In general, a custom processor is exempted from a large percentage of FSIS inspection regulations because products cannot be resold and therefore pose a reduced risk to public health. The owners of the livestock pay custom processors to convert a meat animal into a meat product.

What if I wanted to start my own USDA-FSIS-inspected red meat or poultry processing facility?

There are multiple regulations to meet at the local, state, and federal levels.

What state or local requirements must be met for me to operate a retail exempt facility?

A link to the state requirements for a retail store is on the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) website ( https://www.fdacs.gov/Business-Services/Food/Food-Establishments/Retail-Food-Establishment-Permit ).

What are the regulations about temperature control and receiving perishable goods?

The FDA food code requires refrigerated foods to be held at or below 41°F, so you should document the temperature of all perishable goods at receiving. Recording temperatures are required if you are using reduced oxygen packaging or other specialized processes that require an HACCP plan.

What is NMPAN meat processing?

The Niche Meat Processor Assistance Network (NMPAN; http://www.nichemeatprocessing.org/) has an excellent "How to Get Started" section addressing all facets of a start-up meat processing business.

What happens if a cow cannot get up?

If the cow cannot get up, do NOT try to load her or take her to a slaughter facility (custom or FSIS-inspected). A non-ambulatory beef animal at a custom or FSIS-inspected facility will be condemned.