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Tag: what is an aph on a row crop farm

what is an aph on a row crop farm

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Actual Production History

What is the APH yield exclusion?

The APH Yield Exclusion is a provision of the 2014 Farm Bill. The provision allows farmers to exclude eligible yields which occur from exceptionally bad years (such as a year in which a natural disaster or other extreme weather occurs) from their production history when calculating yields used to establish their crop insurance coverage.

What is a row crop?

Most row crops are “annual” food and fiber plants that can be mechanically planted, irrigated, fertilized, and harvested every year. Annual, in this case, means that these plants have a fairly short life cycle – usually, less than or equal to one year.

How do I get crop insurance for row crops?

Federal crop insurance for specific row crops. To explore crop insurance, contact an Approved Insurance Provider. Whole-Farm Revenue Protection (WFRP) for all commodities on your farm under one insurance policy Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) for crops that are otherwise non-insurable.

Are permanent crops more efficient than row crops?

In terms of technology capitalization, permanent crops usually harbor greater potential than row crops simply because it is in the farmer’s interest to deploy innovative new technology to make production as efficient and cost-effective as possible.

What does APH exclusion mean?

The APH exclusion also could mean a significant economic benefit to rural communities across the nation.

What did the World Trade Organization rulings in a cotton subsidy complaint bring by the Government of Brazil leave cotton answer?

World Trade Organization rulings in a cotton subsidy complaint brought by the Government of Brazil left cotton with nothing but crop insurance as a safety net in case of market or production losses.

Why are cotton belts losing yields?

NCC Chairman Wally Darneille said, “Many producers across the Cotton Belt have incurred yield losses due to severe weather , particularly the past three years. This will greatly assist our producer members who are already making plans for next season.”

Who is the president of the Southwest Council of Agribusiness?

Ricky Bearden, president of the Southwest Council of Agribusiness (SWCA), praised USDA for initiating the APH yield exclusion for the 2015 crop year.

Is the APH exclusion available for 2015?

Department of Agriculture’s announcement today that The Actual Production History (APH) Yield Exclusion, a key element of the Agriculture Act of 2014, will be available nationwide for the 2015 crop year.

Is APH hard to quantify?

Rick Palkowitsh, with the Colorado Corn Growers and a board member on the Southwest Council of Agriculture, says assessing the benefit of the APH exclusion will be difficult. “It is hard to quantify,” he says. “Each farmer is different and each county is different, but I feel like this provides us another tool and another opportunity for farmers hurt by drought in Oklahoma, Colorado, Texas and other areas, to get their APH up.”

Is Kuykendall a good producer?

Kuykendall says it’s a good day for producers to “show how we can work with government agencies to create a safety net. We worked with a lot of groups and USDA and RMA to get this done,” she adds, “and we will continue to work together to get the program implemented.”

What is APH yield exclusion?

The APH Yield Exclusion is a provision of the 2014 Farm Bill. The provision allows farmers to exclude eligible yields which occur from exceptionally bad years (such as a year in which a natural disaster or other extreme weather occurs) from their production history when calculating yields used to establish their crop insurance coverage. The amount of insurance available to a farmer is based on the farmer’s average historical yields. In the past, a year of particularly low yields that occurred due to severe weather beyond the farmer’s control would reduce the amount of insurance available to the farmer in future years. By excluding eligible bad years, farmers will not have to worry that a natural disaster will reduce their amount of insurance for years to come.

How many years are crop years excluded?

Please note: Crop years are only determined eligible to be excluded when the per planted acre yield for the county is at least 50 percent below the simple average of the per planted acre yield for the crop in the county for the previous 10 consecutive crop years. Therefore, while a farmer may have had a bad yield in a specific year, if in that same year the county overall was not at least 50 percent below the simple average yield of the previous 10 consecutive crop years, the individual farmers yield could not be excluded. Crop years eligible to be excluded will be identified by RMA.

What would happen if the yields were low in the past?

In the past, a year of particularly low yields that occurred due to severe weather beyond the farmer’s control would reduce the amount of insurance available to the farmer in future years. By excluding eligible bad years, farmers will not have to worry that a natural disaster will reduce their amount of insurance for years to come.

When did USDA expand crop insurance?

USDA Expands Crop Insurance Options for Producers of Vegetables and Other Crops. Oct 20, 2015

What is NRCS in farm?

The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) will work with you to discuss your goals and develop a conservation plan for your operation. If you want to get started at home, you can also use our Conservation Concerns Tool to explore the different types of conservation issues that could impact the natural resources and productivity of your farm and conservation practices that might be right for you.

What is combined ownership and operating loan?

Combined ownership & operating loans help purchase land and equipment and meet day-to-day costs.

What is ownership loan?

Ownership loans are available to help you purchase land and equipment.

What is PLC in agriculture?

If disaster strikes, we offer other disaster assistance programs to offset losses and get you back on your feet. The Agriculture Risk (ARC) and Price Loss Coverage (PLC) programs, for instance, provide financial protections to farmers from substantial drops in crop prices or revenues and are vital economic safety nets for most American farms.

Where to contact FSA for disaster assistance?

For other disaster programs, contact the Farm Service Agency (FSA) at your local USDA Service Center or use the Disaster Assistance Discovery Tool.

Can USDA help you access capital?

USDA may be able to help you access capital. And we can be a good partner if you aren’t able to get funding from a traditional lender.

What Are Row Crops?

The name “row crops” refers specifically to the way these crops are planted – in densely-seeded, usually machine-laid rows across an entire field.

Why do farmers plant row crops?

Planting row crops allows the farmer more flexibility with how to employ farmland year-to-year. Harvesting and replanting fields every year means that the grower can rotate crops to mitigate degradation of soils, manage use of irrigation water and react to changes in the market that lead certain crops to be more profitable than others. This also affords row crop growers a better ability to react to droughts and other major environmental shocks that force them to change how they allocate their resources in managing the farm.

Why are permanent crops better than row crops?

In terms of technology capitalization, permanent crops usually harbor greater potential than row crops simply because it is in the farmer’s interest to deploy innovative new technology to make production as efficient and cost-effective as possible. The need to offset an initial investment in the land often justifies making technological improvements that will impact the farm’s bottom-line in the long run. Technical innovations in row crop operations, on the other hand, often mimic the shorter-term flexibility of the cropping choices the farmer makes. High-yielding, disease-resistant varieties can be planted in any given year, but if crops are rotated, the value of the technology used to breed those varieties does not become part of the farmland’s value itself.

Why are permanent crops so popular?

Though they represent a much smaller share of total cropland in the US, permanent crops generally fetch a higher economic return than row crops and are growing in popularity due to their profitability. For example, the explosion of almond and pistachio orchards in California’s Central Valley has been driven, especially in the last 50 years, by huge spikes in the value of those crops as foreign demand has increased and nuts have become more popular in snack products domestically.

What is an annual row crop?

Most row crops are “annual” food and fiber plants that can be mechanically planted, irrigated, fertilized, and harvested every year. Annual, in this case, means that these plants have a fairly short life cycle – usually, less than or equal to one year. They need to be replanted every year in order to remain productive, …

How to tell the difference between cropland and permanent cropland?

The simplest way to paint the investment outlook between the different types of cropland is by their risk profiles and timelines. Row crops generally produce stable returns with more flexibility in the short term around farm diversification and operational changes. Permanent crops, on the other hand, tend to reward patience and strategic long-term investment into operational infrastructure and technology that may carry higher initial costs, but would reward the investor and the farmer with high profits after several years.

What is a permanent crop?

What Are Permanent Crops? Instead of being planted, grown and harvested annually, permanent crops can be generally characterized as “perennials” – crops with a life cycle of many years, some up to multiple decades, that are planted once and then maintained and harvested in place throughout their entire life cycle.

How many acres are there in Little Aucilla Ranch?

New to the market and a first time offering in decades. Little Aucilla Ranch consists of 546 acres located in Madison County, Florida made up of row crop, upland hardwood and pine, and beautiful river bottomland along the Little Aucilla River. It is surrounded by large farmland and timber…

How many acres are there in Hunter’s Paradise?

Hunter’s Paradise and so much more. This prime piece of property boasts 260 plus acres of woodland, 43 acres of row crop currently planted in soybean rotation, one mile of river frontage on the South Fork of Forked Deer River, flooded cypress bottom and slough, 10-15+ acres of Wildlife food plots…

Where is Catahoula 825?

The Catahoula 825 is a highly managed and well-maintained Louisiana Trophy Deer and Duck Hunting combo tract located in the Tensas River bottoms of the Mississippi Delta. The property is located just ten minutes Southeast of Sicily Island, LA and 10 minutes Northwest…

Is Cow Creek Ranch on Kincer Road?

The Cow Creek Ranch has extensive paved road frontage on all four sides. The ranch fronts the west side of County Road 25, the north line of County Road 18, the east line of County Road 17 (Rycade School Road), and the south line of Kincer Road. The ranch includes dense areas of large old growth…

Where is Woodley Farms located?

Woodley Farms is an incredibly productive and diverse 114+/- acre property nicely located just 2 miles South of Dumont, Iowa boasting great access, good recreation and substantial income opportunities.ImprovementsLocated just 2 miles South of Dumont, IA and 25 miles Northwest of Cedar Falls…

Where is Welcome Church Road in Alabama?

Situated along a main tributary of Pigeon Creek is the Welcome Church Road Tract in Covington County, Alabama . This property has a good mixture of farmland and mature timberland. There are 50 acres of row crop land that is leased on an annual basis at $3,000 per year. This past year the farmer…

Where is Willow Oaks Farm in Tennessee?

The property is located in Meigs County on Highway 68, a mile from Watts Bar Dam, and centrally located between Knoxville and Chattanooga. Wildlife And Timber The property is part of…

What is the Difference Between a Row Crop and Utility Tractor?

If you’re looking for a tractor for maintaining your land or yard, you can choose from a variety of models to suit your needs. Utility tractors are equipped with a front loader and a backhoe attachment, making them useful for tasks such as plowing under crops in the fall or removing rocks. They’re also often used for grading land and driving piles.

What is a Row Crop Tractor?

A row crop tractor is a lightweight model that’s intended primarily for use in farming operations. Regardless of which type (two-wheel, three-wheel or four-wheel) you choose, it will be smaller and lighter than a utility tractor.

What is a Utility Tractor?

A utility tractor is a mid-sized, high horsepower model that’s capable of both row crop and loader operations. They resemble conventional tractors in many ways, but they’re generally larger and equipped with hydraulics that allow them to attach front-end loaders or other implements such as backhoes.