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Tag: What is the difference between community agriculture and CSA

what is community farming

what is community farming插图

Group farming
Group farming,alternatively known as community farming,is a livelihood approach conceived by CYSD.

What is a community supported agriculture?

In basic terms, CSA consists of a community of individuals who pledge support to a farm operation so that the farmland becomes, either legally or spiritually, the community’s farm, with the growers and consumers providing mutual support and sharing the risks and benefits of food production.

What do you mean by community-based farming?

It consists of a group of small and marginal farmers, and landless poor in a village who work together to utilize the cultivable waste lands or under-utilized lands to earn their livelihoods.The participating farmers can either take community or individual land on lease; or can pool land of individual farmers in a contiguous patch for such farming.

What is group farming or community farming?

Group farming, alternatively known as community farming, is a livelihood approach conceived by CYSD.

What is the difference between community agriculture and CSA?

Composting (turning garden waste, fallen leaves, food scraps and more into natural fertilizer that increases yield and crop health). Community agriculture is similar to community-supported agriculture (CSA) in that they both provide local food to their communities. Where they differ is in their approach.

What is UCC UCF?

The UCC UCF is a nearly year-round, four-season, civic engagement and agriculture education project that started in 2017 in Logan, Utah. The UCC UCF aims to improve food security by increasing civic participation in crop production and by providing a range of education, training, and other resources to the local food-insecure population. Gardeners learn how to maintain efficient and productive small-scale agricultural systems, thereby strengthening individual self-reliance and access to fresh food items, which contributes to the overall strengthening of food security. All crop yields are donated to the local foodinsecure community.

How does community agriculture help the economy?

Community agriculture can increase access to healthy foods like fruits and vegetables, especially in low-income areas with limited access otherwise. It also provides opportunities for public health programming to improve nutritional knowledge and attitudes (Hodgson et al., 2011). Community agriculture aims to increase civic participation in personal food production, while improving both diets and food security. Individuals and households who participate in such programs are over three times more likely to consume fruits and vegetables at least five times a day than people without a gardening household member (Alaimo et al., 2008), leading to improved diets and healthier lifestyles.

What are the challenges of planning and development?

Common challenges experienced during planning and development include location (i.e., adequate sunlight), access to water (i.e., no competition with neighboring properties for water resources), and finding qualified/educated leadership that can handle unforeseen problems (Milburn & Vail, 2010). These programs vary from place to place and are difficult to replicate unless a model from a similar area exists. For example, California has a nearly year-round growing season where many other areas of the country do not. Other factors involved are climate change, local politics, land availability, and funding. The majority of these factors will differ in each locale (Lawson, 2005).

How is community agriculture similar to community-supported agriculture?

Community agriculture is similar to community-supported agriculture (CSA) in that they both provide local food to their communities. Where they differ is in their approach. Community-supported agriculture models are structured in a way that community members pay an amount upfront that covers a weekly produce delivery for the entire season (McMurray et al., 2017). If some of the produce fails, the shareholders have already paid for the risks. Community agriculture works with local farmers, gardeners, and volunteers to donate produce. Using the UCC UCF as an example, participants and volunteers are trained to grow produce with the intention of donating to communities struggling with food security.

What is community agriculture?

Community agriculture initiatives are often run by organizations (1) relying on volunteer structures; (2) growing produce sustainably; and (3) aiming to improve health and access to food in their communities.

Is community agriculture harmful?

Community agriculture also presents potential health and environmental risks. Some factors to examine include the history of the locations (past uses) and proximity to other 3 industrial sites, automobile traffic, and other pollutants. Consider soil and water contaminants stemming from industrial wastes and pollutants, such as heavy metals, hydrocarbons, acids or bases, asbestos, solvents, or pathogenic organisms. Assessment of prior cleanup or containment of a site is extremely important as it can present serious health risks to both producers and consumers through contact with contaminated water and soil. These issues can also lead to the contaminants of foods that may also be a risk if consumed (Hodgson et al., 2011).

What is Tumajore village?

Tumajore village under Hemgir Block of Sundargarh District of Orissa, India is home to 74 households. Scheduled Tribes (STs) constitute 20.72% while Scheduled Castes (SCs) constitute 2.96% of total households. In the absence of irrigation facilities, Tumajore villagers primarily depend on rain-fed agriculture.Non-timber forest produce (NTFP) collection and marketing, particularly that of Mahua flower (used for alcohol preparation) and seeds, forms significant part of their economic activity, during the agricultural lean period between February and June. However, as agriculture production is not sufficient for most of the families to sustain them throught a year, villagers also resort to daily wage labour activities.

When is parwal season in Tumajore?

of parwal is being produced during the peak harvesting season between August and September. Tumajore parwals have carved a niche in the neighboring states of Chhatisgarh (Raipur, Bilaspur and Raigarh), Madhya Pradesh (Bina, Babina, Jhansi, Gwalior and Sagar) and also in the nearby cities of Jharsuguda and Sundargarh of Orissa state.

What is group farming?

Group farming, alternatively known as community farming, is a livelihood approach conceived by CYSD. It consists of a group of small and marginal farmers, and landless poor in a village who work together to utilize the cultivable waste lands or under-utilized lands to earn their livelihoods.The participating farmers can either take community or individual land on lease; or can pool land of individual farmers in a contiguous patch for such farming. In promoting group farming, CYSD has always emphasized active participation of the community members in identifying beneficiaries and planning crop cycles for coming years.

How many households have been cultivating Parwal?

These lands being located near a perennial stream in the village, did not have problem of irrigation. Presently, 66 households have been cultivating parwal in 15 acres of land. The traders had the information of parwal being cultivated in large quantities in this village.

What is the food insecurity in Tumajore?

The village is characterized by high degree of food insecurity among landless families , and those belonging to small and marginal farmer categories. In the absence of alternative source of livelihood, these families are at the mercy of the village landlords and private moneylenders. Even bonded labour (locally known as goti) system is prevalent in the region. As people are depending primarily on subsistence agriculture and producing paddy crop only, cash crops like vegetable cultivation received least priority from the villagers in Tumajore.

How many acres of barren upland were there in the CYSD?

A patch of 3.5 acres of barren upland was identified for the purpose. The land belonged to an individual farmer who had given away the land to the community farming group on lease, thus making available cultivable land which otherwise remained unutilized. CYSD and Village Association members discussed the modus operandi of the project. Together they defined the responsibilities and formulated guidelines for internal management. Upon completion of discussion, farmers began their activities on 09 January 2008.

Why are the uplands in the village barren?

Even during the rainy season, most of the cultivable uplands are left barren due to lack of irrigation facilities.